Author profile: Daniel Golebiewski

Daniel Golebiewski is a PhD student in Political Science at the Graduate Center-City University of New York (CUNY) and the Assistant to the Director for the Center for International Human Rights at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY). He is also a Graduate Assistant at the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center. Daniel holds a MA in Human Rights Studies from Columbia University-Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and a BA in Political Science, with minors in English and History, from John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY). For additional information, please visit his website.

Review – Faith-Based Organizations at the United Nations

Review – Faith-Based Organizations at the United Nations

Addressing a marked gap in IR literature, Haynes provides a timely account of how religious organizations play an increasingly important role in international affairs.

Review – The Endtimes of Human Rights

Review – The Endtimes of Human Rights

Hopgood doesn’t write for novices, nor is his book path-breaking, yet it offers serious, disturbing, food for thought about the concept of Human Rights in transformation.

Religion and Globalization: New Possibilities, Furthering Challenges

Religion and Globalization: New Possibilities, Furthering Challenges

The relationship between religion and globalization is complex, one with new possibilities and furthering challenges.

Christian Traditional Values Prefiguring the Development of Human Rights

Christian Traditional Values Prefiguring the Development of Human Rights

The global expression of human rights found in the UDHR contains an implicit touch of Christian values.

The Arts as Healing Power in Transitional Justice

The Arts as Healing Power in Transitional Justice

The arts may hold healing power in transitioning societies, as they provide a means for survivors of atrocities to deal with the past and tell their stories in a creative way.

‘There’s a Soldier in All of Us’: Call of Duty’s Promotion of US Foreign Policy

‘There’s a Soldier in All of Us’: Call of Duty’s Promotion of US Foreign Policy

Video games like Call of Duty have a propaganda hidden in a message: to protect and promote post-9/11 US foreign policy and military strategy.

Intercultural Communication and Transnational Protests at the Olympics

Intercultural Communication and Transnational Protests at the Olympics

Although the Games are an under-explored phenomenon in IR, they represent one of the longest-standing forums for global interaction in our world.

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