Author profile: Daryl Morini

Daryl Morini

Daryl Morini is an editor-at-large of E-IR. He is pursuing a PhD in preventive diplomacy at the University of Queensland, Australia. Follow him on Twitter @DarylMorini

The Knotted Gun: Practical Solutions to Conflict

The Knotted Gun: Practical Solutions to Conflict

IR academics have a special responsibility to the world, as the inheritors of an enduring and all-important question: How can we prevent future wars?

The IR Survey

The IR Survey

This is the only student-focussed survey of the IR discipline. All IR students are invited to take a few minutes to complete the survey, and IR lecturers are encouraged to share it with their students.

Using Twitter to Simulate @CrisisDiplomacy

Using Twitter to Simulate @CrisisDiplomacy

Governments of all stripes pursue war-gaming, simulations and contingency planning. So why not use Twitter to simulate crisis diplomacy? The potential pay-offs of such simulations make it necessary to try.

The Causes of the New Space Race

The Causes of the New Space Race

The first space race was the start of a new era in human history, not its apogee. There is no guarantee that we will not repeat it. But if money is the sinews of war, this space race will be more formidable than the last.

International Relations and Time

International Relations and Time

The IR calling is a fast-paced, high-intensity, you-snooze-you-loose business. In the academic era of the “publish or perish” doctrine, it is useful to reflect upon time, as both an important variable in IR theory, and a relentless force in our own lives.

Linkage – April 2012

Linkage – April 2012

e-IR’s Linkages feature the most original and interesting IR journal articles. This edition discusses research on decision-making, critical theory, negotiation, China’s potential annexation of the moon, and more.

Linkage – Simulating History to Understand International Politics

Linkage – Simulating History to Understand International Politics

IR students may one day thank Weir and Baranowski for making the discipline more fun via their latest journal article.

Why Australia Fears China’s Rise: The Growing War Consensus

Why Australia Fears China’s Rise: The Growing War Consensus

Inter-state war is threatening to make a dangerous come-back. But the good news is that great power war can be prevented.

Do Not Celebrate the Death of a Dictator

Do Not Celebrate the Death of a Dictator

My blood curdled upon seeing images of a dying Gaddafi. So begins the new Libya, drenched in blood, celebrating the death of its 40-year dictator. I am no apologist for the butchers of 9/11, the rapists of Misrata, or the killers of innocent men, women and children worldwide. But I cannot bring myself to glorify death.

Review – The Role of Energy in Russian Foreign Policy towards Kazakhstan

Review – The Role of Energy in Russian Foreign Policy towards Kazakhstan

This in-depth study into the complex and multi-faceted aspect of the role of oil and gas in Russian foreign policy goes beyond the headlines, taking the reader through the hydrocarbon fields, and into the backroom of energy contract negotiations between the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan since 1991. It is recommended reading for all regional or country-experts and interested readers alike.

Review – America’s Allies and War

Review – America’s Allies and War

The most outstanding aspect of ‘America’s Allies and War’ is the systematic and even-handed manner in which it demolishes popular notions of alliance politics, such as the depiction of European NATO allies as free-riding pacifists, whilst making an important theoretical contribution to the burden-sharing literature and International Relations scholarship in general.

Libya: The Coming Peace

Libya: The Coming Peace

No peace is perfect. But a flawed peace is probably better than no peace at all. Contingency peace plans are not guarantees of success in such war-torn countries as Libya, but neither are they idle dreams. The international community needs such a unified plan to secure a better peace in Libya. If they fail to plan a post-war peace in Libya, the intervening powers are planning to fail.

Did Diplomacy Succeed or Fail in Libya?

Did Diplomacy Succeed or Fail in Libya?

Although all wars may represent a failure of diplomacy, war is often the last resort of diplomacy. This paradox results from two competing ideas of what the supreme objective of diplomacy should be: peace at any cost, or peace by any means. This is the paradox of Libya. The international military intervention resulted from a mixture of an arguably successful strategy of coercive diplomacy at the UN, and a failure of third-party mediations.

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