Author profile: John A. Rees

John A. Rees

John A. Rees is Associate Professor of Politics and International Relations at The University of Notre Dame Australia. His research interests are related to themes of religion and international development, religion and foreign policy and the IR discourse on post-secularism. He is the curator of The Religion Gap blog on E-IR.

Peter Berger – Four Benefits of His Work to the Study of Religion in IR

Peter Berger – Four Benefits of His Work to the Study of Religion in IR

Peter Berger’s work on the enduring importance of religion might save the sub-discipline of religion in IR from turning in on itself.

Why IR Religionists Should Watch Reza Aslan’s Believer

Why IR Religionists Should Watch Reza Aslan’s Believer

To imagine oneself as a believer may benefit IR approaches significantly in the attempt to understand the political imagination borne from religious practice and belief.

The Prince, the Pope and a Populist Moment

The Prince, the Pope and a Populist Moment

Whilst populist movements have shown to be able to exploit sacral tradition, regal and religious institutions can equally employ resources to oppose populist agendas

Religion and Culture

Religion and Culture

There is little that concerns IR that does not involve elements of religion or culture, or both. Understanding them is necessary if you want to join some of the most important discussions about world politics today.

“Son of Lies”: History, Baghdadi and the Legacy of ISIS

“Son of Lies”: History, Baghdadi and the Legacy of ISIS

Whilst the ISIS effect will not disappear overnight, the power to doubt the divine sanction of a failing movement is significant.

Religion in the Archives of IR

Religion in the Archives of IR

Even a cursory glance at IR and related disciplines prior to 9/11 will reveal a body of work interested in religion as a political theme of primary importance.

Citizens Not Zombies: Rethinking Assumptions about US Religious Voters

Citizens Not Zombies: Rethinking Assumptions about US Religious Voters

The habit of homogenising religious political behaviour only leads to sloppy thinking disconnected from the evidence of how really existing religious citizens act

Middle Power Religion

Middle Power Religion

Whilst the study of religion adds value to our understanding of world affairs, the opposite is also true: the concepts of IR add value to our understanding of religion

Why ‘theocracy’ Is a Failed Concept in IR

Why ‘theocracy’ Is a Failed Concept in IR

It’s time for IR scholars and policy makers to let go of the use of the term ‘theocracy’ to explain the dynamics of religion-led politics worldwide.

The Francis Paradox: Papal Diplomacy in a Multipolar World

The Francis Paradox: Papal Diplomacy in a Multipolar World

Vatican diplomacy of recent years reflects what could arguably be known as ‘the Francis paradox’

Four Religions of Foreign Policy

Four Religions of Foreign Policy

There are many healthy debates on religion and foreign policy, but there is still more to say about the nuances of religion at play in the international sphere.

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