Author profile: Martin Beck

Martin Beck holds a chair of Contemporary Middle East Studies at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense. His main current research interests are the Arab uprisings, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, international oil politics and international relations of the Middle East. In 2016, he co-edited (with Dietrich Jung and Peter Seeberg) the volume The Levant in Turmoil: Syria, Palestine, and the Transformation of Middle Eastern Politics (New York: Palgrave). His most recent publications include: Martin Beck (2017), How to (Not) Walk the Talk: The Demand for Palestinian Self-Determination as a Challenge for the European Neighbourhood Policy, European Foreign Affairs Review 22(1): 59-74, Martin Beck (2017), Israeli Foreign Policy: Securitizing Occupation, in: Robert Mason (ed.),  Reassessing Order and Disorder in the Middle East. Regional Imbalance or Disintegration?, Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 173-193.

Securitization of Refugees in Europe

Securitization of Refugees in Europe

Securitization of refugees to Europe varies when measured in terms of intensity and effectiveness. Yet, political discourse has been shaped by securitization attempts.

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Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Policy and the Failure of the Doha Oil Negotiations

The decision of Saudi Arabia to let the Doha summit fail may be considered as a stone in the mosaic of Riyadh converting its foreign policy approach.

The Arab Uprisings Five Years After

The Arab Uprisings Five Years After

In several Arab countries transformation is dominated, by political violence. The polity has broken down—the central state fails to deliver security to its citizens.

Contextualizing the Current Social Protest Movement in Lebanon

Contextualizing the Current Social Protest Movement in Lebanon

Social movements that seek to combat corruption in Lebanon face a large number of obstacles when attempting to apply strategies suitable to change the system.

Image by Rusty Stewart

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: From Occupation to (De)Legitimization?

The (de)legitimization game has recently gained significance in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and is made sense of by critically discussing three basic assumptions.

Upgrading the Arab League by Establishing a Joint Military Force?

Upgrading the Arab League by Establishing a Joint Military Force?

It cannot be excluded that the initiative to build a Arab military force will share the fate of previous launches: a big announcement followed by a rather low performance

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