Author profile: Mohammed Nuruzzaman

Dr. Mohammed Nuruzzaman is Associate Professor of International Relations at the Gulf University for Science and Technology, Kuwait. His primary areas of teaching and research interests are international relations theories, global political economy, traditional and non-traditional security studies, great powers in the global order, political Islam and politics and international relations of the Middle East. He has published in leading international peer-reviewed journals, including Canadian Journal of Political Science, International Studies Perspectives, Cooperation and Conflict, Journal of Contemporary Asia, International Studies, International Area Studies Review, and Journal of Asian and African Studies. He is currently working on the project ‘Shi’a – Sunni Sectarian Violence and Middle East Regional Security’.

The Nuclear Deal Was Not for Mending Frayed Iran-US Relations

The Nuclear Deal Was Not for Mending Frayed Iran-US Relations

The signing of the nuclear deal was driven by some immediate interests of Iran as well as the US, leaving deep strategic and political differences unaddressed.

Middle East: Moving Towards a Sectarian Political Order?

Middle East: Moving Towards a Sectarian Political Order?

Sectarian violence has vitiated regional politics and foreign policies along sectarian lines. The fight between the Shi’ite and Sunni crescents is likely to continue.

Photo by Jayel Aheram

The Islamic State – One Year On

The IS can no longer be viewed as a passing phenomenon and may expand in the future – unless it is coerced into total submission or at least denied a footprint in Iraq.

Saudi Airstrikes on Yemen: Limits to Military Adventurism

Saudi Airstrikes on Yemen: Limits to Military Adventurism

The Saudis will continue to perceive the Houthis as powerful political and military opponents and feel the need to keep them at bay

The Islamic State and Its Viability

The Islamic State and Its Viability

The IS is a reality that it is here to stay, and it looks to have set for gradual expansion of its territorial boundaries to redraw the political map of the Middle East.

Revisiting ‘Responsibility to Protect’ after Libya and Syria

Revisiting ‘Responsibility to Protect’ after Libya and Syria

R2P contains glaring theoretical drawbacks and its practice by Western powers creates the scope for a mix up of humanitarian concerns with their strategic interests.

Winners and Losers in the Syrian Civil War

Winners and Losers in the Syrian Civil War

The Syrian civil war has shaken up the political and strategic environment of the Middle East region, with all outcomes likely to bring political and economic uncertainties.

The Iran Nuclear Deal – A Preliminary Analysis

The Iran Nuclear Deal – A Preliminary Analysis

The recent interim agreement between Iran and the P5+1 raises interesting implications for regional peace and stability in the Middle East, particularly in relation to Israel and Saudi Arabia.

Towards a Pluralistic Nuclear Middle East

Towards a Pluralistic Nuclear Middle East

The imperatives for nuclear proliferation in the Middle East are deeply rooted in the historical-structural dynamics and strategic compulsions of the Iranians, the Israelis, and the Arab states. Given the right context, proliferation can bring stability.

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