Author profile: Ramesh Thakur

Ramesh Thakur is Professor in the Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. A former UN Assistant Secretary-General, he was one of the ICISS Commissioners and co-author, with Gareth Evans, of its R2P report. Among other works, he is the author of The United Nations, Peace and Security: From Collective Security to the Responsibility to Protect (Cambridge University Press), and The Responsibility to Protect: Norms, Laws and the Use of Force in International Politics (Routledge).

Israel’s Serial Gaza Offensives Are Offensive

Israel’s Serial Gaza Offensives Are Offensive

Does the R2P apply in Gaza? This is a silly question – of course it does. R2P is a universal principle, not a light switch to be turned on and off at whim or convenience.

Syria and the Responsibility to Protect

Syria and the Responsibility to Protect

Syria has thrown up challenges, but not thrown out the R2P. There is an interest in clarifying the norm to prevent misuse but no demand to rescind the norm.

Syrians Are Paying the Price of NATO Excesses in Libya

Syrians Are Paying the Price of NATO Excesses in Libya

The China–Russia veto does not prove the irrelevance of the UN Security Council. Rather, it proves that the politics of the Security Council must be got right before an R2P military intervention; and the political equilibrium should be maintained during the operation.

R2P, Libya and International Politics as the Struggle for Competing Normative Architectures

R2P, Libya and International Politics as the Struggle for Competing Normative Architectures

The UN was neither designed nor expected to be a pacifist organisation. Its origins lie in the anti-Nazi wartime military alliance amongst Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union. The all-powerful UN Security Council is the world’s duly, and only, sworn in sheriff for enforcing international law and order.

Libya: The First Stand or the Last Post for the Responsibility to Protect?

Libya: The First Stand or the Last Post for the Responsibility to Protect?

When security forces, meant to protect people, are instead let loose in a killing spree, the state itself becomes the prime perpetrator of atrocities. With precisely such an unfolding scenario, Libya today is the place and time to redeem or renege on R2P’s solemn pledge.

Burma and the responsibility to protect: first, do more good than harm

Burma and the responsibility to protect: first, do more good than harm

Paranoid and mistrustful of the outside world, Burma’s generals were criminally tardy in permitting emergency humanitarian supplies and personnel to come into the country after a devastating cyclone in early May. Yet attempts to invoke R2P were ill advised.

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