The Art of Strategy – With Dan Cox & Bruce Stanley

In a world full of political, military, and geostrategic transitions, The Art of Strategy adds two more voices to the chorus of those that observe world events with concern over the potential for future conflict. By focusing on the most pressing current strategic security issues, the blog facilitates a lively discussion that will inform students, academics and practitioners. The blog is curated by Dan Cox and Bruce Stanley who have two decades of collective experience teaching military officers from the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines at the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies.

People watch a TV screen showing file footage of U.S. President Donald Trump, right, South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, April 18, 2018. Trump has given his "blessing" for North and South Korea to discuss the end of the Korean War at their summit next week amid a diplomatic push to end the North Korean nuclear standoff. The signs read: " Summit meeting between South and North Korea, the United States and North Korea ." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

The Survival of the US–Japan, US–ROK Alliance under a Potential Peace Treaty

With potential talks of a peace treaty going on among the US, South Korea, North Korea and China, the future of the US–Japan, US–ROK alliance seems to be at stake.

Image by Kevin Schoenmakers

Forecasting the Future: Prospects of a Negotiated Settlement with North Korea

Approaching the negotiations between the United States and North Korea through a systematic fashion, the harsh reality is that these negotiations are very likely to fail.

Image by Lawrence Wang

Normalization Negotiations between North Korea and Japan Revisited

Japan is taking preemptive actions to normalize relations with North Korea in light of the upcoming summit talks between Kim and Trump, and negotiations with South Korea.

US and Russia: The Gray Zone Spiral Toward Open War

US and Russia: The Gray Zone Spiral Toward Open War

While many view Russian use of the Gray Zone as a strategic conundrum, such conflicts can logically lead to open warfare.

Specialist Eleazar Mattocks, USA, Charlie Company 2-1 Infantry, Fort Wainwright, Alaska, using helmet camouflage and a Colt 5.56 mm M16A2 rifle with an M203 40mm grenade launcher, demonstrates a platoon battle drill attack for the Thai Forces during the COBRA GOLD 2001 exercises. COBRA GOLD '01 is regularly scheduled, joint-combined exercise designed to ensure regional peace and strengthen the ability of the royal Thai Armed Forces to defend Thailand or respond to regional contingencies.  This year's exercise, the 20th in the series, will focus on peace enforcement operations.  (USAF PHOTO BY SRA LESLIE LAWRENCE 010517-F-1379L-004)

North Korea: The Perils of Ignoring the Good Problem

Without grappling with the potential “good problem” of the collapse of the DPRK, the United States could find itself winning a war but losing the peace.

What Has Russia Achieved in Syria?

What Has Russia Achieved in Syria?

Syrian intervention has showcased to the world that Russia is again a military power to be reckoned with, capable of sustaining a military campaign far from its borders.

10th Anniversary Post – Why E-IR Is Awesome for Us

10th Anniversary Post – Why E-IR Is Awesome for Us

The opportunity to interact with academics and theoreticians on E-IR is integral to preventing discussions on military thought and practices turning into an echo chamber.

Anticipating Future Cyberattacks on the High Seas

Anticipating Future Cyberattacks on the High Seas

Assuming away both cyberattacks and an expansion of the gray zone is a sure recipe for experiencing fundamental strategic surprise.

Image by Matthew Clark

Fatal Distraction: Maintaining Proper Focus in Chaos

Will the US be able to effectively focus its efforts and convince the world that its policies and strategies are correct despite the distraction of the latest headlines?

Image by Kenny Holston

Buying our Way Out of Afghanistan?

A privatization of the Afghanistan war risks signaling that the U.S. is no longer obliged to remain nationally engaged, and can choose whether or not to meet obligations.

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