Ivory Tower – With Stephen McGlinchey

Far from being an intellectual arena disconnected from everyday life, today’s academia is driven by research impact and innovative teaching. The Ivory Tower brings together scholars from around the world to reflect on teaching, learning, service and research to help demystify the role of the modern-day academic. The blog is curated by Dr Stephen McGlinchey, Senior Lecturer in International Relations at the University of the West of England and E-IR’s Editor-in-Chief.

The Three Week IR Course

The Three Week IR Course

Looking back on a course at the end of a semester is something that every professor does. It’s an opportunity to see what has worked out as planned and to assess how useful the course was for the students.

24 Years, 10 Days

24 Years, 10 Days

It’s 24 years and 10 days since Chinese soldiers executed citizens for daring to demand the right to a say in their own future. Since then, China has changed in many ways, but much has sadly stayed the same.

Notes from Shanghai

Notes from Shanghai

For a western politics professor, it is natural to try to keep your eyes open for differences in everyday life under communist rule in Shanghai. Yet aside from the internet censorship, there is little that leaves one worried.

The Ambassador’s Atlas

The Ambassador’s Atlas

The words we use in international politics, whether teaching, writing, researching, speaking or as political actors, matter a great deal. Things like an atlas are a gentle but constant reminder of exactly that.

Banned

Banned

Teaching politics in China is going to be a different experience. The prospect makes one pause and recall the sorts of freedoms we enjoy in the West and the way professors do sometimes take them for granted.

From Moral to Amoral

From Moral to Amoral

It is going to be rather enjoyable to watch the students discuss and recognise exactly where the amoral world of self-interest inevitably leads – and then to see if they will learn from it in the lessons that follow.

What’s a Prof to Do?

What’s a Prof to Do?

CEFAM is a business school that demands attendance in classes. But, in spite of this, there is still the need to encourage and even incentivise students to attend instead of heading for the sun and sand of the south of France.

China, India and the New Class

China, India and the New Class

POL 210 has a new class. In order to spark early discussion with students, a report was used which described how Chinese soldiers inside Indian territory had proclaimed the area to be Chinese land.

Reflecting on the Spring

Reflecting on the Spring

The POL 210 course for spring has drawn to a close. For students, it will be a couple of days of relaxation before an intensive summer session. For professors, it represents a chance to reflect on a semester’s teaching

A Crisis Resolved

A Crisis Resolved

Through taking part in the devised Crisis Simulations, the POL 210 students have emerged with a settlement as planned and hopefully a greater appreciation for the complexities of international politics.

The Crisis Erupts

The Crisis Erupts

Influenced by the plot of a Tom Clancy novel, the POL 210 simulation this week focuses on a resource hungry China which invades the Russian East in search of minerals and natural resources to feed its growing economy.

Setting the Scene for Crisis

Setting the Scene for Crisis

This week marks the beginning of a three-class-long Crisis Simulation. Through these simulations, students can learn about the complexity of international security and the difficulty of managing crises.

The Power Politics Game

The Power Politics Game

Games allow professors to show students that knowledge does not only have to come from a lecturer, but can also be experienced. Through games, students appreciate the complexities of international politics.

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