Foreign Policy

The Incompatibility of COIN Warfare and Nation-Building in Iraq and Afghanistan

The Incompatibility of COIN Warfare and Nation-Building in Iraq and Afghanistan

The disjuncture between kinetic elements of American COIN doctrine and the nation-building mission inherent to ‘new’ conflicts lies at the root of ongoing difficulties.

The ICC and Africa: Complementarity, Transitional Justice, and the Rule of Law

The ICC and Africa: Complementarity, Transitional Justice, and the Rule of Law

The absence of preemptive and positive complementarity in the ICC’s proceedings is the largest obstacle to creating a lasting benefit for African state judicial systems.

Coalition ‘Victory’ in Iraq as a Result of the ‘Surge’ and ‘Anbar Awakening’

Coalition ‘Victory’ in Iraq as a Result of the ‘Surge’ and ‘Anbar Awakening’

The synergistic interaction between the ‘Anbar Awakening’ of 2006 and the surge of 2007 paved the way for U.S. withdrawal at the expense of a long term, stable, Iraq.

The Economy is Organic: Reclaiming the Post-Crisis Development Agenda

The Economy is Organic: Reclaiming the Post-Crisis Development Agenda

To correctly assess contemporary reevaluations of development theory, we must understand its origins and their effect on how the global community views development today.

Global Governance and the Democratic Aspect of Cross-Border Communications

Global Governance and the Democratic Aspect of Cross-Border Communications

The technological intensification of the communication channels across the globe will trigger the need for governing the democratic aspect of cross-border communications.

Recontextualising the ‘War on Terror’: Discursive Practices from Bush to Obama

Recontextualising the ‘War on Terror’: Discursive Practices from Bush to Obama

The strategies employed by the Bush administration after 9/11 to manufacture public consent for action have since been recontextualised towards Iran by Barack Obama.

Explaining the Case for Invading Iraq from a Neo-conservative Perspective

Explaining the Case for Invading Iraq from a Neo-conservative Perspective

The Bush administration’s invasion of Iraq was a story of neo-conservative ideas (militarism, morality, and democracy) about the role of America in the world.

Will Japan Become a Nuclear Weapons Power?

Will Japan Become a Nuclear Weapons Power?

Japan’s non-nuclear policy appears to be a pragmatic realisation of numerous domestic factors, perceptions of regional security, and faith in the US alliance.

Fuel to the Fire: Why a Nuclear Iran Will Further Destabilize the Middle East

Fuel to the Fire: Why a Nuclear Iran Will Further Destabilize the Middle East

Four grave risks for regional stability lurk in the wake of a nuclear Iran: regional proliferation, an ‘imbalance of terror’, an emboldened Iran, and Israel’s response.

Is Democracy a Cause of Peace?

Is Democracy a Cause of Peace?

As the causal mechanisms and positivist epistemology underpinning it are questionable, the democratic peace should be understood as part of a more complex causal process.

Analysing the Lord’s Resistance Army Through Liberalism & Social Constructivism

Analysing the Lord’s Resistance Army Through Liberalism & Social Constructivism

Using the case study of the Lord’s Resistance Army in northern Uganda, liberalism’s approach to peacebuilding is inadequate compared to social constructivism’s.

Was the Communist Party of Yugoslavia a Leninist Party?

Was the Communist Party of Yugoslavia a Leninist Party?

The Communist Party of Yugoslavia was a thoroughly Leninist party. Even at those moments when it appeared to go against Lenin, its adherence to him was near complete.