War and Peace

Why the Military Did Not Take Over: Understanding Pakistan’s Democratic Path

Why the Military Did Not Take Over: Understanding Pakistan’s Democratic Path

Continued democracy in Pakistan is a consequence of the military deciding not to intervene, as they believe they can wield power over the weak civilian government.

A Critical Assessment of the Application of Responsibility to Protect in Libya

A Critical Assessment of the Application of Responsibility to Protect in Libya

The application of Responsibility to Protect in Libya was a success in that it mobilised the UNSC to act decisively with remarkable speed and fully in accordance with R2P

‘Material Breach’: A Valid Justification for Military Intervention in Iraq?

‘Material Breach’: A Valid Justification for Military Intervention in Iraq?

The concept of ‘material breach’ was used as a political tool to justify military action in Iraq in 2003 by the U.S. and U.K., as opposed to a legal justification.

Victim-Politics and Post-Conflict Foreign Policy in Rwanda and Sri Lanka

Victim-Politics and Post-Conflict Foreign Policy in Rwanda and Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka and Rwanda elicit a sense of victimhood upon which their respective foreign policies have been built.

The Incompatibility of COIN Warfare and Nation-Building in Iraq and Afghanistan

The Incompatibility of COIN Warfare and Nation-Building in Iraq and Afghanistan

The disjuncture between kinetic elements of American COIN doctrine and the nation-building mission inherent to ‘new’ conflicts lies at the root of ongoing difficulties.

Nigeria’s “Resource Curse”: Oil as Impediment to True Federalism

Nigeria’s “Resource Curse”: Oil as Impediment to True Federalism

Whilst Nigeria’s history of colonialism can partly explain the difficulties of achieving a functioning federalism, its ‘resource course’ is also a significant hindrance.

Coalition ‘Victory’ in Iraq as a Result of the ‘Surge’ and ‘Anbar Awakening’

Coalition ‘Victory’ in Iraq as a Result of the ‘Surge’ and ‘Anbar Awakening’

The synergistic interaction between the ‘Anbar Awakening’ of 2006 and the surge of 2007 paved the way for U.S. withdrawal at the expense of a long term, stable, Iraq.

The Just War Tradition and Utopian Political Thought

The Just War Tradition and Utopian Political Thought

War is neither humane nor inhumane; it is merely human, and to elevate the phenomenon to a humane altitude is a utopian project beyond mankind’s present reach.

The Economy is Organic: Reclaiming the Post-Crisis Development Agenda

The Economy is Organic: Reclaiming the Post-Crisis Development Agenda

To correctly assess contemporary reevaluations of development theory, we must understand its origins and their effect on how the global community views development today.

Recontextualising the ‘War on Terror’: Discursive Practices from Bush to Obama

Recontextualising the ‘War on Terror’: Discursive Practices from Bush to Obama

The strategies employed by the Bush administration after 9/11 to manufacture public consent for action have since been recontextualised towards Iran by Barack Obama.

Explaining the Case for Invading Iraq from a Neo-conservative Perspective

Explaining the Case for Invading Iraq from a Neo-conservative Perspective

The Bush administration’s invasion of Iraq was a story of neo-conservative ideas (militarism, morality, and democracy) about the role of America in the world.

Fuel to the Fire: Why a Nuclear Iran Will Further Destabilize the Middle East

Fuel to the Fire: Why a Nuclear Iran Will Further Destabilize the Middle East

Four grave risks for regional stability lurk in the wake of a nuclear Iran: regional proliferation, an ‘imbalance of terror’, an emboldened Iran, and Israel’s response.