Humanitarian Intervention

Humanitarian Intervention: Advantages and Disadvantages in East Timor and Kosovo

Humanitarian Intervention: Advantages and Disadvantages in East Timor and Kosovo

The intervention in East Timor illustrated how armed force can save lives, but intervention in Kosovo failed to provide a long-term solution and did more harm than good.

Does the R2P Doctrine Represent a Positive Step for Human Rights?

Does the R2P Doctrine Represent a Positive Step for Human Rights?

R2P, although a symbolic moral step for human rights, is not a sufficiently effective positive step, and is too militaristic in its approach.

The International Humanitarian Law Implications of the ‘Tallinn Manual’

The International Humanitarian Law Implications of the ‘Tallinn Manual’

Despite some significant issues, the Tallin Manual still provides a foundation to assess the legality of cyber warfare in international and non-international armed conflict.

Have the Norms of Sovereignty Altered to Provide for Humanitarian Interventions?

Have the Norms of Sovereignty Altered to Provide for Humanitarian Interventions?

The only humanitarian interventions that seem to be widely accepted are those authorised by the Security Council under the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations.

Libya: The Moral Permissibility Of ‘Operation Unified Protector’

Libya: The Moral Permissibility Of ‘Operation Unified Protector’

The jus ad bellum principles show that the intervention in Libya was justified, and offers an example of how to respond to the idea of civilian protection.

Terrorists and INGOs in Intra-State Conflicts

Terrorists and INGOs in Intra-State Conflicts

In trying to improve the actions of both terrorist organisations and INGOs working in intra-state conflicts, policy makers need to change the incentives driving these actors.

The Impact of the ICISS Report on State Sovereignty

The Impact of the ICISS Report on State Sovereignty

The evidence shows that ICISS report does not signify a change in state practice or in international law, but it did achieve to reframe the discourse on intervention and sovereignty.

Use and Abuse of Human Rights Discourse

Use and Abuse of Human Rights Discourse

Politicising human rights reduces their potential to act as a standard against which regimes can be measured and affects power in the international sphere. The War on Terror is an example of this trend.

The Changing Nature of Sovereignty

The Changing Nature of Sovereignty

The nature of sovereignty has changed from one which vests states with the right to non-intervention, to one which grants them certain responsibilities towards its own population.

Theoretical Approach to Understanding NATO Intervention in Libya

Theoretical Approach to Understanding NATO Intervention in Libya

NATO’s political objective superseded humanitarian considerations. A liberal argument for the primacy of human rights cannot account for NATO’s conduct in Libya.

The International Community and the Prevention of Genocide

The International Community and the Prevention of Genocide

Whilst advancements have been made in the prevention of genocide, they fail to protect vulnerable populations due to a lack of political will.

Can Stable Democracy Be the Outcome of Military Interventions?

Can Stable Democracy Be the Outcome of Military Interventions?

Only in rare cases does military intervention lead to stable democracies. Successful democracy implementation is usually dependent on the internal factors and conditions of a state.