Post Tagged with: "civil-military relations"

A female member of the Swedish Infantry Battalion attached to UNFICYP on target practice at Battalion Headquarters, Larnaca. The 12 female members of the battalion were the first women to join the Force in Autumn 1979.
1/Jun/1980. Larnaca, Cyprus. UN Photo/John Isaac. www.un.org/av/photo/

Women in UN Peacekeeping: Historical and Contemporary Patterns

As the inclusion of women among peacekeeping elements continues to expand, hopefully future research into the phenomenon will continue to emerge.

The Failed Coup in Turkey: Prolonged Conflict in the State Apparatus

The Failed Coup in Turkey: Prolonged Conflict in the State Apparatus

Contrary to the hegemonic paradigm that has portrayed the military as an elitist institution, this paper considers civil-military relations as a field of class struggle.

The Contested Use of Force in Germany’s New Foreign Policy

The Contested Use of Force in Germany’s New Foreign Policy

Stakeholders and the German public should not shy away from the debate about the appropriate role of the use of force in Germany’s foreign and security policy.

Review – Routledge Handbook of Civil-Military Relations

Review – Routledge Handbook of Civil-Military Relations

The Handbook fills a lacuna in the civil-military relations literature by offering up-to-date empirical analyses of civil-military relations in a variety of regime types around the world.

Civil-Military Relations In the U.S:  What Needs to be Done?

Civil-Military Relations In the U.S: What Needs to be Done?

The current situation of the U.S. civil-military relationship has problematic aspects for parties on both sides. Through active dialogue between the two comunities these issues can be addressed.

Egyptian and Syrian Civil-Military Relations

Egyptian and Syrian Civil-Military Relations

The civil-military relations in Egypt and Syria help explain their domestic strife and the expected outcome after this ends. Both countries will face problems until these relations are resolved.

Review – Democratic Civil-Military Relations

Review – Democratic Civil-Military Relations

The demands placed on European democracies have re-prioritized values for the armed forces. This book offers a pioneering study of the challenges in democratic civil-military relations.

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