Post Tagged with: "international law"

Israeli Settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories: Legal under International Law?

Israeli Settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories: Legal under International Law?

International law could serve as a framework to clarify some of the disputed issues in the Israel-Palestinian conflict. Under this framework Israel cannot claim to have a valid title to the Occupied Palestinian Territories – neither historically, nor based on the Palestine Mandate.

Calculating Whether a Two-Year Term on the UN Security Council is Worth Seeking

Calculating Whether a Two-Year Term on the UN Security Council is Worth Seeking

Australia has not withdrawn its SC candidacy. Whether that confidence is warranted will be revealed next week when the General Assembly meets to elect nonpermanent members of the Security Council.

The International Law Dimensions of the Plight of Julian Assange

The International Law Dimensions of the Plight of Julian Assange

The Assange saga has taken a number of unexpected turns. The only way forward would appear to be a political solution. Yet, there is no immediate prospect of such a resolution occurring.

Liberal Legal Internationalism: A History (and Present) of Double Standards

Liberal Legal Internationalism: A History (and Present) of Double Standards

Liberal legal internationalism is anything but liberal, legal or international. International law today is as rife with double standards as it was nearly five centuries ago during times of colonial conquest.

Geopolitical Challenges to Implementing the Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities

Geopolitical Challenges to Implementing the Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities

After a failed effort by the EU in 2011, the international community will once again take up the issue of a Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities at the UN in October. Diverging national interests threaten to derail the talks.

The Western Sahara Peace Process: Tragedy or Farce?

The Western Sahara Peace Process: Tragedy or Farce?

The UN mandate to achieve a political solution that will afford Western Sahara its long denied right to self-determination is a farce and everyone knows it.

A Critical Introduction to the ‘Legalisation of World Politics’

A Critical Introduction to the ‘Legalisation of World Politics’

Contrary to realist expectations, states have frequently engaged in institutionalised co-operation even under conditions of anarchy.

The Karadzic Case: Fair Trial or Show Trial?

The Karadzic Case: Fair Trial or Show Trial?

Radovan Karadzic, the former President of the Bosnian Serb Republic, finds himself on trial at an international tribunal established to prosecute him. His legal defense, Peter Robinson, asks whether it is a fair trial or show trial.

Humanitarian Intervention: A Legal Analysis

Humanitarian Intervention: A Legal Analysis

The fact is that humanitarian intervention is here to stay. Instead of trying to get rid of it there is more prudence in allowing the lesser evil of a streamlined and legally-regulated form of humanitarian intervention to continue.

The ICTY and the Challenges of Reconciliation in the Former Yugoslavia

The ICTY and the Challenges of Reconciliation in the Former Yugoslavia

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has issued 161 indictments since its establishment in 1993. But has it had a positive impact on peace and reconciliation?

Intervention in the Internal Affairs of States

Intervention in the Internal Affairs of States

The moral imperative to intervene in a nation’s internal affairs where acts of genocide are threatened is a powerful one. That the UN is eager to push the doctrine of R2P and to re-define sovereignty to permit intervention in a state’s internal affairs is testimony to the fact that the Charter does not provide that legal authority. It should.

Leal’s Execution was Legal (Sort Of), But That Doesn’t Make it Right

Leal’s Execution was Legal (Sort Of), But That Doesn’t Make it Right

The international community watched with muted anger Friday afternoon as Texas executed Mexican national Humberto Leal Garcia after the Supreme Court refused to stay his sentence. Little doubt remains that in doing so, the United States violated the 1963 Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and this is not the first such occurrence.

The Limits and Pitfalls of the International Criminal Court in Africa

The Limits and Pitfalls of the International Criminal Court in Africa

While we should scrutinise the ICC’s work in Africa, it is important to recognise that international justice is not the only possible response to atrocity. National and local processes are proving to be vital tools of justice, truth and reconciliation across Africa, more profound and lasting than the prosecution of suspects in The Hague.

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