Post Tagged with: "latin america"

UNASUR and the Eurozone Crisis

UNASUR and the Eurozone Crisis

Regionalism in Europe is driven by economic efficiency and capital accumulation. In contrast, issues in the Americas, south of the Rio Grande, remain the old problems of dependency, barriers to development, and effective sovereignty.

The Lightning Impeachment of Paraguay’s President Lugo

The Lightning Impeachment of Paraguay’s President Lugo

The decision by the Paraguayan Chamber of Deputies to impeach President Fernando Lugo revealed the major fault lines of Paraguay’s transition to democracy. It was a political crisis waiting to happen.

An Election Short on Hope:  Mexico 2012

An Election Short on Hope: Mexico 2012

Mexico’s recent Presidential election returned the PRI back to power twelve years after the party was ousted. Numerous problems continue to plague the country. This election won’t change that.

Latin America’s International Projection: Trends and Trajectories for 2012

Latin America’s International Projection: Trends and Trajectories for 2012

Three trends are likely to characterise the global projection of Latin America in 2012: the rise of Brazil; the mushrooming of projects supposedly aimed at promoting Latin American unity; and summitry with the US, the EU, and China.

21st Century Threats: Non State Actors, Participatory Democracy and Social Rights

21st Century Threats: Non State Actors, Participatory Democracy and Social Rights

The Americas are menaced by the emergence of a reactionary bloc of states & the rise of non-state actors that threaten to plunge the region into chaos.

Why Hugo Chavez’s Illness Matters

Why Hugo Chavez’s Illness Matters

On June 10th President Hugo Chavez went under the knife in Havana to remove what Venezuelan officials called a pelvic abscess. Since that date, Chavez has been out of the public eye. For a loquacious president fond of giving seven hour speeches to a bleary-eyed audience, this is an extraordinary amount of time to maintain silence, leading to rampant speculative fervour within Venezuela, and internationally.

¿A qué estaríamos dispuestos a renunciar, nosotros los europeos? / As Europeans, what would we be willing to accept?

¿A qué estaríamos dispuestos a renunciar, nosotros los europeos? / As Europeans, what would we be willing to accept?

In 1992 I was 12 years old, I was just a kid… In Genoa, naturally, they were celebrating the 500 years since the so called “discovery of America”. A Genoese, Christopher Columbus, by chance landed on a small Carribean island and since that day many things have changed. From the protests against that event, one statement sticks in my head: “1492, Don’t accept caravelles from a stranger”.

Bolivia’s New International Stage

The December 2005 election of Evo Morales as the president of Bolivia captivated international attention. Not surprisingly, it was greeted (by supporters and critics alike) as part of the region-wide shift to the left. Morales has worked to realign Bolivia away from its earlier Washington orbit and closer to anti-American bona fides like Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez and Cuba’s Fidel Castro. But he’s playing a dangerous game.

U.S. Policy Toward Latin America: Is Mild the New Bold?

In May 2008, U.S. Democratic Party presidential candidate Barack Obama released a set of prescriptions for U.S. policy toward Latin America. Senator Obama has no Latin America-related experience, and so we would not expect either profundity or much challenge to the status quo. However, his proposals sparked a debate that sums up the depths to which the U.S.-Latin American relationship under the Bush Administration has fallen.

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