Post Tagged with: "NATO"

NATO in Afghanistan: There and Back Again

NATO in Afghanistan: There and Back Again

By invading Afghanistan, NATO took both political and moral responsibility for its future. It is possible that, at the end of the transition process, NATO will fail its test of responsibility

NATO’s Chicago Summit: A Snapshot of the Alliance’s Slow-motion Overhaul

NATO’s Chicago Summit: A Snapshot of the Alliance’s Slow-motion Overhaul

NATO’s recent Chicago Summit produced no truly historical decisions. It did what was required to keep the Alliance’s slow-motion overhaul on track, focusing on taking forward a “responsible” transition in Afghanistan and the cause of “smart” defence back home.

NATO and Afghanistan: Lessons Learned?

NATO and Afghanistan: Lessons Learned?

At present, the NATO mission in Afghanistan is a failure. Though the Taliban regime was overthrown, violence continues to plague daily life across the country.

Russia’s Foreign Policy in Kosovo

Russia’s Foreign Policy in Kosovo

Russia’s Balkans strategy is one of deterrence. It will maintain a high-profile denial of Kosovo’s independence and attempt to block the new nation from the international stage.

Rebalancing Priorities: America, Europe, and Defence Austerity

Rebalancing Priorities: America, Europe, and Defence Austerity

Faced with fiscal pressures at home and rising powers elsewhere, the US is reducing its troop presence in Europe. The interests of European security can be best served by Britain and France developing a stronger joint expeditionary capacity.

Syrians Are Paying the Price of NATO Excesses in Libya

Syrians Are Paying the Price of NATO Excesses in Libya

The China–Russia veto does not prove the irrelevance of the UN Security Council. Rather, it proves that the politics of the Security Council must be got right before an R2P military intervention; and the political equilibrium should be maintained during the operation.

Libya: The End of Intervention

Libya: The End of Intervention

Without Western responsibility for the outcome of the intervention in Libya and without any transformative promise, Western powers were strengthened morally and politically through their actions, whereas in Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq, they were humbled and often humiliated.

Was the International Intervention in Libya a Success?

Was the International Intervention in Libya a Success?

The UN-mandated intervention in Libya is now officially at an end. Perhaps only time will tell whether Libya turns out to have been a great case of international intervention or something rather less.

Qaddafi’s Death is Only the Beginning in Libya

Qaddafi’s Death is Only the Beginning in Libya

The death of Qaddafi is, naturally, a very public symbol that his reign of oppression is over and will not return, but this is not the end of the story for Libyans, the UN or NATO. The campaign to maintain peace between the various factions could prove to be more difficult than the defeat of Qaddafi’s forces.

What role for the EU in the new Libya?

What role for the EU in the new Libya?

Perhaps, looking back at the EU’s performance in the Libyan crisis in five years’ time, the best lesson to (re-) learn is that the EU is not good at hard security policy, but does a very decent job when the task is about dealing with the aftermath of conflict. Stable democracies cannot be built on the battlefield. They require a whole different set of capabilities than what NATO can offer.

How to Lose a Revolution

How to Lose a Revolution

Some are calling the coalition intervention that began 19 March 2011, in Libya a success. I call tens of thousands of deaths and injuries a tragedy. When such casualties occur owing to a military intervention never shown to be necessary, the intervention is a failure.

R2P, Libya and International Politics as the Struggle for Competing Normative Architectures

R2P, Libya and International Politics as the Struggle for Competing Normative Architectures

The UN was neither designed nor expected to be a pacifist organisation. Its origins lie in the anti-Nazi wartime military alliance amongst Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union. The all-powerful UN Security Council is the world’s duly, and only, sworn in sheriff for enforcing international law and order.

Transatlantic Relations: A Case for Optimism

Transatlantic Relations: A Case for Optimism

In the coming weeks as the Libya drama comes to a climax and as the debate on Afghanistan sharpens on what happens next, the European nations will have to make a decision on what kind of transatlantic relationship they want, or need, or value. The option of grumbling dependency is over, an era of shared responsibility and mutual contribution is about to dawn.

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