Post Tagged with: "philosophy"

Review – Reconstructing Human Rights

Review – Reconstructing Human Rights

This remarkable and innovative book offers an original understanding of human rights and contributes to the reflection on the nature and role of political theory.

Review – Antonio Gramsci

Review – Antonio Gramsci

McNally’s edited book acquaints novices with the substance of Gramsci’s thought, but fails on its own terms by ignoring the supposed universality of Gramscianism.

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Interview – Nicholas Onuf

Professor Onuf discusses the professionalization of scholarship, the influence of his book ‘World of Our Making,’ and the top ten tips for flourishing in academia.

Review – The Philosophy of Sociality

Review – The Philosophy of Sociality

Raimo Tuomela explicates the concept of “us” and what it means to act as group. What Tuomela does in this book is to examine an old idea and reveal what we understood by it all along.

Review – History of International Political Theory: Ontologies of the International

Review – History of International Political Theory: Ontologies of the International

Hartmut Behr’s recent book is a fascinating critical reconsideration of how generations of political thinkers have appraised the interplay between universal and particular interests among the relations of states in their understandings of “the world” from Western antiquity through the present-day

Michel Foucault’s Political Philosophy

Michel Foucault’s Political Philosophy

I recently wrote a book about the thought of Michel Foucault. It was published last year under the title The Political Philosophy of Michel Foucault. The book begins with a justification of the use of the term ‘political philosophy’ in relation to Foucault. The reason for caution about this term is precisely the reason why I think it is justified to use it in the title of the book.

What the Philosophy of Science is Not Good For

What the Philosophy of Science is Not Good For

The field of IR has been concerned about its scientific status for decades. This concern has led to a number of efforts to make the field “truly scientific” by adopting one or another philosophical and methodological stance: behaviorism in the 1950s, neopositivism in the 1970s and 1980s, and critical realism in the 1990s.

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