Post Tagged with: "secularism"

Turkey Today: A “Leviathan” or a “Law-seeker”?

Turkey Today: A “Leviathan” or a “Law-seeker”?

The profound social and political changes Turkey has undergone have made it a law seeking nation. Ankara is now on the path to becoming a full fledged democracy under the rule of law.

Secularism and Respect for Religion

Secularism and Respect for Religion

Religion-politics separationist view, which is clearly normative rather than scientific, can take quite different forms, either as an idea or as practice and can be more or less restrictive, I shall call ‘secularism’. While acknowledging the variety of forms it can take I want to argue that one of the most important distinctions we need to make is between moderate and radical secularism.

Secularism and Religion in Modern Democracies

Secularism and Religion in Modern Democracies

I want to draw attention to a key point that is frequently overlooked—that, in the context of modern pluralism, we must now regard secularism as one of those worldviews that plays a quite significant role in the direction and nature of the modern state. And, further, once we do this, our whole understanding of the role of religion in the modern state is transformed as well.

Beyond Secularism

Beyond Secularism

Secularism has long been the language of most public servants and many scholars in the Western world, enabling both groups to work and live as though religions were irrelevant to their respective fields. This perspective has meant that religious phenomena have been ignored or reduced to other categories such as civil society, humanitarianism or as part of a definition of “civilization.”

Politics of secularism and IR

Politics of secularism and IR

It has been suggested that the rise of religion confronts IR theory with a theoretical challenge comparable to that of the end of the Cold War or the emergence of globalization. I agree. To understand why we need to turn to the politics of secularism. How might we think about secularisms, in the plural, as forms of political authority in contemporary international relations? What does this mean for IR theory and the resurgence of religion? What kinds of politics follow from different forms of secular commitments, traditions, habits, and beliefs?

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