Author profile: Afa'anwi Ma'abo Che

Afa’anwi Ma’abo Che holds a Ph.D in Politics from Swansea University, UK. He is a winner of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies – China Africa Research Initiative’s research grant/fellowship for 2019. Afa’anwi is a Senior Lecturer in International Relations and Peace Studies and the Deputy Director of postgraduate studies at Kampala International University, Uganda. He has published in reputable outlets, including the UN-affiliated Peace and Conflict Review, Peace and Conflict Studies, International Journal on World Peace and on E-IR.

China’s Rise in the African Franc Zone and France’s Containment Policy

China’s Rise in the African Franc Zone and France’s Containment Policy

Any curtailment to China’s ambitions in Franc Zone Africa would only dent people’s prospects of benefiting from its unmatched commitment to the continent.

Linking Instrumentalist and Primordialist Theories of Ethnic Conflict

Linking Instrumentalist and Primordialist Theories of Ethnic Conflict

Extant explanations of ethnic conflict typically fall under two fundamental theories. Neither can independently explain ethnic conflicts satisfactorily.

Humanitarian Intervention in Libya: Not Clash of Civilizations

Humanitarian Intervention in Libya: Not Clash of Civilizations

Hans Koechler’s claim that the NATO intervention in Libya supported Huntington’s Clash of Civilizations is problematic and has the potential to derail future UN sanctioned interventions.

On Mediation Efficacy: Clarifying the Current Controversy

On Mediation Efficacy: Clarifying the Current Controversy

Biased/manipulative mediators are more efficient in generating agreements but are less effective in producing peace; conversely, neutral/facilitative mediators are less efficient but more effective.

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