Author profile: Jenny Poon

Jenny Poon is a Ph.D. candidate at the Faculty of Law of the University of Western Ontario, a Barrister & Solicitor in Ontario, and a Senior Fellow at the Canadian International Council. Jenny was a Visiting Fellow at the Refugee Studies Centre of the University of Oxford, a former Visiting Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, and was the recipient of the American Society of International Law International Refugee Law Essay Award and the EU Studies Association Haas Fund Fellowship. Jenny’s research examines non-refoulement as a norm in international and European law through a comparative analysis of United Kingdom and Germany. Jenny’s research interests include international refugee law, EU asylum law, migration control and human rights. Under the supervision of Professor Valerie Oosterveld, Jenny is working on a Ph.D. dissertation entitled “Non-Refoulement in International and European law: A Comparative Analysis between the United Kingdom and Germany”. Using a doctrinal approach, Jenny’s thesis undertakes a comparative analysis of how the United Kingdom (UK) and Germany address the international legal principle of non-refoulement in their legislation, regulations and jurisprudence concerning asylum seekers. Jenny focuses upon the UK and Germany because they are two of the largest asylum-receiving countries in the European Union (EU) during the time period under consideration. As such, their practices with respect to non-refoulement affect large numbers of asylum applicants and also likely influence how other countries interpret the non-refoulement obligation.

Non-Refoulement Obligations in Offshore Detention Facilities

Non-Refoulement Obligations in Offshore Detention Facilities

Cooperation with third States where refugees are sent to be detained in offshore detention facilities would lead to a violation of non-refoulement indirectly.

Legal Responses to the EU Migrant Crisis: Too Little, Too Late?

Legal Responses to the EU Migrant Crisis: Too Little, Too Late?

To properly safeguard the rights of asylum claimants and refugees, regional courts should play a larger role in the adjudication of asylum decisions.

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