Articles

The International Politics of Peak Oil

Richard Heinberg • Mar 5 2008 • Articles
During the past decade a growing chorus of energy analysts has warned of the approach of “Peak Oil,” the time when the global rate of extraction of petroleum will reach a maximum and begin its inevitable decline. While there is some dispute as to when it will occur, there is none as to whether. The global peak is merely the cumulative result of production peaks in individual oilfields and in whole oil-producing nations.

Britain in Europe: A Response to John Redwood

Anand Menon • Mar 4 2008 • Articles
In addressing John Redwood’s claims about the European Union and the process of ratification of the Lisbon Treaty, I will not dwell on the rank hypocrisy that characterizes much, if not most, British political debate on the latter issue. Suffice to say that it suffuses all three major parties. Rather, in considering what passes for the substance of Redwood’s critique, we must navigate a bewildering mélange of half truth and innuendo.

Burma/Myanmar: The Chinese Dilemma

David Steinberg • Feb 20 2008 • Articles
There has been considerable agitation among the many critics of the Myanmar military that China has been less than insistent on Burmese reforms as it continues to provide funding and support to the military junta. Whatever pressures China has brought on Myanmar -and they may have been considerable- have been relatively quiet and discreet in contrast to the U.S. and EU public demands for change. Yet reform in Burma is in the long-term interests of the Chinese Government.

Searching for the Indigenous Voice in a New Arctic Scramble: Berlin Conference Part II or a New Global Politics?

Jessica Shadian • Feb 20 2008 • Articles
Historically, the Arctic has held a definitive place in global politics. This history, however, is one defined and written about far from the Arctic itself. The narrative includes endless tales of national exploration and its centre stage military role during the Cold War. As such the Arctic has always provided a tell tale sign of all things political. The present-day is no exception.

Hiding in Plain Site: Why don’t reporters talk to voters?

Chris Daly • Feb 15 2008 • Articles
As it turns out, the big story so far from the American presidential campaign is the turnout. Evidence is mounting that U.S. voters are shaking off their customary apathy and voting in record numbers. Not only that, the surge of extra voters is clearly tilted in favor of the Democrats, a trend that may be setting the stage for a Democratic landslide in November.

Britain in Europe in 2008: Big World, Bad Europe, Ugly Consequences

John Redwood • Feb 14 2008 • Articles
The whole process of the Lisbon Treaty’s ratification over recent weeks, both here and abroad, has revealed just how undemocratic a construct the EU project has become. I…

The Politics of Renewable Energy: Unintended Consequences of Biofuel Policies

Robert Rapier • Feb 10 2008 • Articles
Government policies often generate unintended consequences. This has turned out to be the case with the aggressive biofuel policies pursued over recent years by the European Union and the United States.

Apathetic about Democracy: Engaging Young Voters

Mary Scott • Feb 10 2008 • Articles
There is a worrying trend of growing apathy amongst young people towards politics. The United Kingdom’s Electoral Commission published a report in 2002 called ‘Making an Impact’, which found that voter turnout among young people was at an unprecedented low point at the 2001 general election.

Why We Need to Hear the Voiceless: Media Coverage of Civilians in War

Sarah Holewinski and Josh Yager • Feb 9 2008 • Articles
It's impossible to pick up the paper or turn on the TV these days without the headlines bleeding together: "Dozens Killed After Suicide Blast in Baghdad," "7 Children Killed in Airstrike in Afghanistan" or "20 Die in Somalia Blast." From the news, it seems civilians caught in combat on today's battlefields hardly have a chance. Compared to their military counterparts, that may be true.

Democracy, Tribalism and Hunger: The View in Kenya

Sara Nics • Feb 5 2008 • Articles
As in the other five slums in the city, people in Eastleigh are poor. They survive on far less than the average daily wage in Kenya, which is equal to about one and a half U.S. dollars. Lack of food is only one of their troubles. The political turmoil has exposed and exacerbated decades-worth of tribal tensions. While apparent to many Kenyans, for most of the international community, those tensions were hidden under the thin veneer of an emerging democracy with steady economic development and relative state stability.

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