Reviews

Review – Stamped from the Beginning

Cliff (Ubba) Kodero • Apr 3 2020 • Features
Ibram X. Kendi's book is a thought-provoking account of America's racial history and its impact on people of colour, providing a theorization of global anti-blackness.

Review – The Age of Illusions

Elizabeth Austin • Mar 25 2020 • Features
Bacevich argues that the road from American expectations of global supremacy and perpetual prosperity to the economic realities of the US in 2016 led to Trump's election.

Review – Revolutionary Brothers

Glen Segell • Mar 17 2020 • Features
Tom Chaffin's book explores the friendship between Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette and the revolutionary alliance that followed.

Review – Quantum Mind and Social Science

Rainer Ricardo • Mar 10 2020 • Features
Alexander Wendt claims the supremacy of scientific realism by establishing a synthesis between two irreconcilable ontologies: the physical and social.

Review – The Future of War

Jack Howarth • Feb 29 2020 • Features
Freedman employs an inter-disciplinary approach to explore the many failed predictions on the future of war and encourages a healthy scepticism towards them.

Review – The Politics of Compassion

Eva Botella-Ordinas • Feb 26 2020 • Features
This fascinating book is a major contribution to understanding the politics of humanitarianism and citizens’ agency in the current international neo-liberal global order.

Review – Partitions

Carter Johnson • Feb 15 2020 • Features
Dubnov and Robinson explore the use of partitions by the British Empire, how they were manipulated transnationally to serve British interests, and their impacts today.

Review – The Kurds of Northern Syria

Jordi Tejel • Feb 8 2020 • Features
Allsopp and van Wilgenburg draw on interviews to provide a detailed and less romanticized account of the emergence, consolidation and crisis of the DAA in Northern Syria.

Review – The Bivocal Nation

Stéphane Voell • Jan 28 2020 • Features
Batiashvili explores Georgian statehood and history by evaluating Georgian national narratives and 'bivocality' to understand how the modern nation has been formed.

Review – Capital et idéologie

Torbjørn L. Knutsen • Jan 16 2020 • Features
An impressive tome that seeks to explain the legitimizing ideologies which are used to justify the unequal distribution of wealth and income both historically and today.

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