Post Tagged with: "energy"

Review – Energy Dependency and Corruption in the Former Soviet Union

Review – Energy Dependency and Corruption in the Former Soviet Union

Margarita M. Balmaceda’s important book shows Ukraine’s struggle to free itself from Russia influence whilst highlighting that the benefits of energy dependency do not flow only to the hegemonic side.

India’s Approach to Sanctions on Iran

India’s Approach to Sanctions on Iran

Although India has publically chastised Western sanctions against Iran’s oil exports, it is quietly beginning to comply with them. This apparent contradiction stems from Indian policymakers desire to balance its diverging interest in the U.S. and Iran.

Japan’s Nuclear Future

Japan’s Nuclear Future

The great risk in Japan today and well into the future is that the lessons of Fukushima are being skewed, ignored or marginalized in a nation where nuclear energy represents a significant and abiding risk.

Review – Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet

Review – Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet

Klare’s analysis is timely, well written, and intriguing considering its central thesis that the world’s reliance on fossil fuels will eventually lead to increased geopolitical tensions. While other books offer a more thorough account, this is a welcome read.

Review – The Role of Energy in Russian Foreign Policy towards Kazakhstan

Review – The Role of Energy in Russian Foreign Policy towards Kazakhstan

This in-depth study into the complex and multi-faceted aspect of the role of oil and gas in Russian foreign policy goes beyond the headlines, taking the reader through the hydrocarbon fields, and into the backroom of energy contract negotiations between the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan since 1991. It is recommended reading for all regional or country-experts and interested readers alike.

Nuclear Meltdown

Nuclear Meltdown

The accident in Japan may not prove to be as serious as that at Chernobyl in 1986, in that its direct radiological impacts will not be felt across such a wide area, but its political and economic effects could well be just as significant. The tragedy may shift priorities towards renewable energy. If so, the painful lesson that we can’t rely on nuclear technology may not have been in vain. After all, if technologically advanced Japan can’t handle nuclear power safely, who can?

The international politics of peak oil and energy policy

The international politics of peak oil and energy policy

The abrupt rises in oil prices in recent years coupled with worry about the long-term viability of a fossil-based economy have prompted some writers to foretell the coming of a ‘new dark age’ of Malthusian proportions. Very little appears to abate the current and soaring demand for oil, even as world oil production reaches it peak.

Water and Cooperation

Water and Cooperation

Recent news in June 2008 that a Japanese firm has prototyped a car that runs on the reaction between metal hydride and water, did not cause joy in my heart. I was delighted to learn it was not really true. Like the rush to biofuels based on plants people eat, putting even small amounts of water into a car only bodes ill for the environment and human rights ahead. Meanwhile, climate change offers too much fresh water here, too little there, or too saline yet other there. Sorting out the public health/human rights of water from the ecological issues will be a stern challenge for politics at all levels of governance.

The Nuclear Question: what should we demand from Iran?

The question about what the international community should demand from Tehran may seem inappropriate in light of last autumn’s NIE. ‘Why should we demand anything at all?’ one may ask. Perhaps from now on suspicions should be erased and Iran should enjoy its “inalienable rights” to conduct unlimited enrichment on its soil. This is simply not the case.

The International Politics of Peak Oil

The International Politics of Peak Oil

During the past decade a growing chorus of energy analysts has warned of the approach of “Peak Oil,” the time when the global rate of extraction of petroleum will reach a maximum and begin its inevitable decline. While there is some dispute as to when it will occur, there is none as to whether. The global peak is merely the cumulative result of production peaks in individual oilfields and in whole oil-producing nations.

The Politics of Renewable Energy: Unintended Consequences of Biofuel Policies

Government policies often generate unintended consequences. This has turned out to be the case with the aggressive biofuel policies pursued over recent years by the European Union and the United States.

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