Posts written by: A.C. McKeil

Aaron McKeil is an Editor-at-Large for E-IR and a Deputy Editor for the Millennium Journal of International Studies. Aaron previously served as the Articles Editor at E-IR and Senior Commissioning Editor at the Journal of International Law and International Relations. He holds a BA Political Science from the University of British Columbia, a MScEcon International Relations (Distinction) from Aberystwyth University and is engaging a PhD International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research interests involve the English School, the philosophy of science and IR, IR pedagogy, the history of international ideas and the meaning of world society.

IR and the Pursuit of Knowledge: Endless Theoretical Questions?

IR and the Pursuit of Knowledge: Endless Theoretical Questions?

Questions and reflections drawn from Tim Dunne, Lene Hansen and Collin Wight’s laudable and important EJIR special issue, ‘End of International Relations Theory?’ and its companion symposium.

International Relations as Historical Political Theory

International Relations as Historical Political Theory

Linking History to Political Theory, with an international bridge, gathers deep and important questions, which form an intellectual and academic pursuit greater than the sum of its parts.

Waltz, Wight and Our Study of World Politics

Waltz, Wight and Our Study of World Politics

Waltz and Wight addressed important questions, both for scholars, practitioners and society at large. While not entirely successful in solving them, their works continue to inspire our thinking today.

Is IR a Force for Good in the World Today?

Is IR a Force for Good in the World Today?

The average person knows little or nothing about IR’s issues. This lack of relevance suggests that the discipline should be more self-critical. The next stage in IR’s development should not be theoretical – but attitudinal.

The Iraq War in International Society

The Iraq War in International Society

The humanitarian and democratic war motives that partly contributed to the illegal and bloody Iraq war are symptomatic of the old normative contradictions of international society.

Turned Inside-Out: The Concept of the Political and Reflexive International Relations

Turned Inside-Out: The Concept of the Political and Reflexive International Relations

While international politics is fettered and formed by the imperious political culture of the West, IR is developing a reflexive turn. That turn gives a new compelling impetus to the popular and radical traditions of resistance and critique.

Linkage – Don’t Blame Theory!

Linkage – Don’t Blame Theory!

Christian Reus-Smit diagnoses IR’s disciplinary ailment in Millennium’s latest special issue by pointing out that an anti-theoretical turn to pragmatist problem-solving research is not the correct prescription for IR.

Linkage – Dividing Discipline

Linkage – Dividing Discipline

Kristensen’s article fills a quantitative gap in the literature on the divisions of IR scholarship with bibliographic coupling, which maps the communication networks of the discipline.