Post Tagged with: "humanitarian intervention"

Review – Can Intervention Work?

Review – Can Intervention Work?

Stewart and Knaus argue that the international community is capable of stopping mass atrocities. Yet, it must adopt an incremental approach burnished by local knowledge and expertise.

Syria: A Litmus Test for Chinese Foreign Policy

Syria: A Litmus Test for Chinese Foreign Policy

Chinese officials appear consistent in supporting a peaceful transition and a political outlet in Syria. China may be passing the test of ascending to international leadership.

Has Kofi Annan Failed in Syria?

Has Kofi Annan Failed in Syria?

One can see why some would argue that the Annan plan has failed. However, it is important to retain a realistic perspective about how much a third-party mediator can hope to achieve given the circumstances.

Syria and the Responsibility to Protect: Rhetoric Meets Reality

Syria and the Responsibility to Protect: Rhetoric Meets Reality

Syria surely demonstrates, in all too graphic detail, the limits of R2P and the pressing need for creative thinking about profound reforms of the UN which address the P5 veto in the Security Council and the absence of a UN standing army.

Humanitarian Intervention: A Legal Analysis

Humanitarian Intervention: A Legal Analysis

The fact is that humanitarian intervention is here to stay. Instead of trying to get rid of it there is more prudence in allowing the lesser evil of a streamlined and legally-regulated form of humanitarian intervention to continue.

Tea with Madam Secretary, Part I

My most recent interview was with Madeleine Albright, the US foreign policy practitioner and policy-maker, the women’s rights implementer in foreign policy during her time as a US Ambassador to the UN and as Secretary of State, the daughter of a Czechoslovak dissident who was a recipient of US support during WWII and the Cold War, and finally as the academic examining foreign policy.

Was the International Intervention in Libya a Success?

Was the International Intervention in Libya a Success?

The UN-mandated intervention in Libya is now officially at an end. Perhaps only time will tell whether Libya turns out to have been a great case of international intervention or something rather less.

Intervention in the Internal Affairs of States

Intervention in the Internal Affairs of States

The moral imperative to intervene in a nation’s internal affairs where acts of genocide are threatened is a powerful one. That the UN is eager to push the doctrine of R2P and to re-define sovereignty to permit intervention in a state’s internal affairs is testimony to the fact that the Charter does not provide that legal authority. It should.

R2P: Seeking Perfection in an Imperfect World

R2P: Seeking Perfection in an Imperfect World

While the development of R2P as a concept has been the preserve of international relations theoreticians (albeit ones with large amounts of practical experience), its implementation rests on the practitioners of the day. And these practitioners deal in the world of realpolitik with all of its inconsistencies, relativities and competing national interests.

How to Lose a Revolution

How to Lose a Revolution

Some are calling the coalition intervention that began 19 March 2011, in Libya a success. I call tens of thousands of deaths and injuries a tragedy. When such casualties occur owing to a military intervention never shown to be necessary, the intervention is a failure.

Whither R2P?

Whither R2P?

With the exception of Raphael Lemkin’s efforts and the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, no idea has moved faster in the international normative arena than “the responsibility to protect”. While blow-back from Libya is inevitable, nonetheless R2P is alive and well.

The Responsibility to Protect – The Cases of Libya and Ivory Coast

The Responsibility to Protect – The Cases of Libya and Ivory Coast

The United States, France and Britain invaded Libya with cruise missiles, stealth bombers, fighter jets and attack jets. In addition, the United Nations and France have been bombing the Ivory Coast to protect civilians. The Responsibility to Protect doctrine, which is being used to legitimate these attacks, is a slippery slope that should be viewed with extreme caution.

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